Design & Technology

Fashion & Textiles

Graphic Design

Food Preparation & Nutrition

Resistant Materials & GCSE Engineering

The Design Technology classrooms are found at the front of the school in the JB Block. Design Technology is studied by all students during KS3 using a carousel system, rotating around Graphics, Resistant Materials, Fashion & Textiles and Food & Nutrition topics. Those subjects are then optional at KS4 for all students, along with GCSE Engineering, with mixed ability grouping used in all year groups. Students can then elect to study these subjects as a post-16 course.

What is the Curriculum within Key Stage 3 Design Technology?

The Key Stage 3 Design Technology curriculum includes the use of a broad range of knowledge, skills and understanding, and prompts engagement in a wide variety of activities. Pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts. Through evaluation of past and present Design Technology, pupils develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. They learn to use current technologies and consider the impact of future technological developments. Our aim is to develop young people’s practical designing and making ability, and their creativity in solving real and relevant problems. Pupils follow a carousel of subject areas including Food & Nutrition, Textiles, Graphics and Resistant Materials and will study every subject area for one rotation each year. The projects undertaken at KS3 are specifically designed to lead into KS4 studies and create opportunities for pupils to learn the key skills needed. They are a dynamic, ongoing process involving pupils, teachers and representatives of industry where possible, and enable pupils to think creatively.

What will the students learn in Design Technology?

All lesson look to develop creative, innovative and confident students through the technology areas. Schemes of work across the key stages give students a broad and exciting curriculum encompassing core design skills, encouraging risk taking and developing subject specific expertise.

D&T KS3 Curriculum Map

What is the Curriculum Intent within Key Stage 4 Design Technology?

Fashion and Textiles

The Fashion and Textiles curriculum is designed to build on the core knowledge of D&T within the KS3 curriculum, while focusing on the applied study of the Fashion and Textiles industry. This gives students the opportunity to develop a wide range of appropriate skills as well as developing their creativity and ability to problem solve. Studying in this project based style curriculum develops lots of transferrable skills that are applicable not only to other subject areas, but more importantly to further education and employment based situations. The course is structured to give students a well-rounded knowledge of the whole Fashion and Textiles design and manufacture process covering everything from fabric design through to clothing manufacture. We encourage students to take creative risks and try new things, we try to introduce as many new skills as possible to give students the best possible chance of succeeding in their studies. The carefully planned curriculum will inspire students to continue with Fashion and Textiles Design in further education.

Graphic Design

The Graphic Design curriculum is designed to build on the core knowledge of D&T within the KS3 curriculum, while focusing on the applied study of the graphic design industry. This gives students the opportunity to develop their creative thinking and development skills by being challenged to experiment with different media. If students do not choose to continue with Graphic Design they will have developed creative problem solving skills that will enable them to look at the world differently. The course is structured to encourage students to develop a passion for presentation and an understanding of how as consumers we are manipulated by Graphic design to buy certain products. We encourage students to take an analytical approach to their understanding of methods, processes and outcomes of their own work and that of others. The carefully planned curriculum will inspire students to continue with Graphic Design in further education.

Resistant Materials - Design and Technology (9-1)

The GCSE Design & Technology curriculum is designed to build on the core knowledge of D&T within the KS3 curriculum and reflect the demands of a truly modern and evolving society. With the pace of technological development and the need for more sustainable consumerism, design technology has never been so vital. Students are given opportunities to solve design based problems that meet consumer needs but which also address current issues within the world of work. A carefully planned curriculum will nurture through skills, knowledge, understanding and experience. The end result of this will allow students to respond to contexts and develop their own original creative responses by knowing which skills and knowledge to apply independently to achieve a desirable outcome. We encourage students to take an analytical approach to their understanding of methods, processes and outcomes of their own work and that of others. The carefully planned curriculum will inspire students to continue with RM D&T in further education.

Engineering Design

The Engineering Design curriculum is designed to build on the core knowledge of D&T within the KS3 curriculum, while focusing on the applied study of the engineering industry. This gives students the opportunity to understand how to develop a design specification and study the processes involved in designing new engineered products, while understanding how you consult with a client and, with its practical focus, will engage them in producing, testing and evaluating a prototype. We encourage students to take an analytical approach to their understanding of methods, processes and outcomes of engineering design and developed problem solving skills that will enable them to look at the world differently. The course is structured to encourage students to develop a passion for design & development and will inspire students to continue with Engineering Design in further education

Food Preparation and Nutrition

Students will study the AQA Food Preparation and Nutrition (8588).

The first examination for this course was taken in 2018, so it is relatively new and replaces all other GCSE Food based qualifications. The focus of this course equips students with an array of culinary techniques as well as knowledge of nutrition, food traditions and kitchen hygiene and food safety. Topics covered can be broken down into five sections.

Food, nutrition and health Food science Food safety Food choice Food provenance

How are the students assessed at KS4?

Engineering Cambridge National
  • 25% internally assessed unit - Developing & presenting engineering designs
    Students are taught a range of design skills including hand drawn isometric, orthographic, exploded and oblique drawing, modelling with card and styrofoam and drawing in CAD. Again they complete a practice unit in year 10 in order to build skills and understand the assessment criteria before completing their assessed coursework in yr 11. The design and development work is centred around the F1 in schools development class competition which they can use to enter the competition if they wish.
  • 25% internally assessed unit - 3D design realisation
    Students will produce a prototype of their design work from the previous design unit following an extensive production plan that they have written. They will use tools and equipment to produce a prototype model as well as CNC equipment such as the CNC router, 3D printer and laser cutter to produce a final working prototype. For their coursework this will be the F1 in schools car they designed from the previous unit. Students will complete a practice unit in year 10 just as they did for the other units in order to gain experience of the processes involved.
  • 25% externally set & assessed exam - Design briefs, specifications & user requirements.
    Throughout the course students will gain theory knowledge from the other units as well as have specific theory lessons in order to prepare them for the exam. The exam in 1 hour in length and is sat in May or June of year 11. Again students have a practice in the form of a mock exam and mini quizzes.
Food Preparation & Nutrition GCSE
  • 50% externally set and assessed written exam
    100 marks, multiple choice questions (20 marks). Five questions with a number of sub-questions (80 marks)
  • 50% NEA tasks.
    Task 1 Food investigation—based on working characteristics, functional & chemical properties of ingredients. Includes practical work. And a folder of evidence.
    Task 2 Food preparation Assessment—prepare cook and serve three dishes with an accompanying folder of evidence
Graphic Design NCFE
  • 50% Internally Assessed Project based work
    Four units of work spread over the 2 year course.Unit 1: Introduction to Graphic Design. Students will undertake a range of tasks that enable them to explore  key Graphic Design principles; isometric sketching, showing texture, orthographic projections, drawing from 1, 2 & 3 point perspectives, visual language, typography, composition & layout, line, tone, colour theory, imagery, CAD, product analysis, design development. They will develop a sketchbook of skills followed by a brief-led design project.Unit 2: Graphic Design Practice. Students will undertake research into design movements, existing Graphic Designers and Graphic Design disciplines. They will explore presentation techniques, how to use design inspiration, CAD, development techniques, colour theory, evaluation skills, as well as developing their skills of drawing nets, composition, creativity, design hierarchy, experimentation, analysing existing work and communicating ideas.Unit 3: Responding to a Graphic Design brief. Students will use the design process to respond to a design brief; analysing tasks, interpreting client requirements, research tasks including moodboards, analysing existing products effectively, idea generation, idea development, experimentation, CAD solutions, final outcomes and reviews.Unit 4: Graphic Design Portfolio. Students will conduct research into the Graphic Design industry and various professions within it. They will research types of portfolio, analysis skills, portfolio production, how to produce physical and electronic portfolios, review and interview skills
  • 50% Externally set and assessed task. 10 hours practical examination.
    Students will practice skills for how to interpret a design brief in preparation for a 10 hour practical exam where they will be required to respond to a given brief under exam conditions. This will involve research skills, ideas generation, reflection and review skills.
Fashion & Textiles BTEC
  • 25% Internally Assessed Unit - Introduction to Specialist Pathways in Art & design
    Students will undertake a design and make project exploring the fundamental aspects involved in the process of designing a product and seeing it through to manufacture and presentation. They will learn how to use and document visual inspiration, about pattern adapting, clothing manufacture, decoration and manufacturing techniques all to enable them to produce a top quality outcome.
  • 25% Internally Assessed Unit - Communicating in 2D
    Students will undertake an illustration project that showcases some of the skills they have developed in Unit 1 whilst developing new skills illustrating clothing and costumes. It will also assess the transferable skill of communication. Students will produce a 2D outcome in the form of a poster or magazine cover in addition to their sketchbook work.
  • 25% Internally Assessed Unit - Communicating in 3D
    Students will undertake a design and make project evidencing their 3D design and manufacture skills based on a theme. Students will evidence their development of skills and exploration into a wide variety of fashion and textiles techniques. The final outcome will be an item of fashion clothing with supporting sketchbook work.
  • 25% Externally Assessed Unit - 10 hour practical examination with set theme
    Students will receive their exam topic in January of Year 11. They will then spend a number of weeks developing a response to the exam task before completing a 10 hour practical exam in April. They will be expected to produce an outcome developed from studies into a set theme in response to a specific textiles related design brief.
Design & Technology Timbers GCSE
  • 50% NEA  coursework project, 
    In year 10 students complete a series of projects in order to prepare them for their coursework. These involve building skills and knowledge of working with timbers, metals & plastics the properties of these materials and the tools and processes needed to cut, shape and join them in order to produce products. We also build on skills in drawing and designing with a range of skills including hand drawn isometric, orthographic, exploded and oblique drawing, modelling with card and styrofoam and drawing in CAD. As well as the theory covered in the practical projects we provide short theory inputs at regular intervals in order to cover the curriculum and prepare them for the exam. In June of year 10 students are given 3 themes from the exam board, each theme has 2 contextual challenges. Students are required to choose one of these contextual challenges to base theif assessed coursework on. They then work through the design cycle from researching the contextual challenge through to a range of design proposals and onto producing a final prototype that can be tested. This project will take them up to between February half term and Easter of year 11 after which they will revise and prepare for the exam.
  • 50% Written Examination - 1 hour 45 minutes.
    Throughout yr 10 & 11 students gain theory knowledge throughout their lessons in order to prepare them for their esam. The exam is split into 2 parts, part A is based on core knowledge of design & technology and is worth 40 of the 100 marks available. The core knowledge covers topics such as the impact of new and emerging technologies, knowledges of materials such as timber, metals, polymers, mechanisms, textiles, basic electronics and smart materials. Issues to do with sustainability and generation of energy. Past and present designers. Part B is worth 60/100 marks and covers knowledge of designing and working with timbers and a range of topics connected to this such as selection of material, sustainable design with timber etc. Students have mini quizzes throughout yr 10 & 11 as well as a mock exam in order to prepare them for their final exam in May/June of yr 11.

What are Level 1/2 Technical Awards like? (AQA Exam Board)

Level 1/2 Technical Award subjects are ideally suited to learners with a preference for practical, rather than theoretical learning, and all have a focus on creativity. These qualifications fulfil entry requirements for academic and vocational study post-16, and will count as equivalent to one GCSE.

The Level 1/2 Technical Awards provide learners a whole host of easily transferable skills. They include developing a wide range of practical making skills linked to the chosen course. Students will also develop an understanding of commercial processes. Additionally learners will gain transferable skills such as communication and teamwork that will benefit them in the workplace

What is GCSE Engineering like? (OCR Exam Board)

This course is intended as an introduction to Engineering, and allows students to develop skills and understanding which will be of use both generally and as part of a progressive career path leading to further technical or academic engineering qualifications. It is a course for students of a more technical nature who enjoy exploring the material world around them. Additionally, it is for students who wish to study how things work, not just what they look like. There are strong links with ICT, Physics, Business Studies and Maths. Students will require at least a grade 4 in maths at the end of Year 9.

D&T KS4 Curriculum Map

SCA Grade Descriptors for D&T